Thank you for your contribution

Mahalo for your generous support!

Please check your email for your contribution receipt.  Don’t see it right away? Be sure to check your spam and add htbg.com to your accepted email.

If you did not receive your emailed receipt, please contact us.

 

You can be proud that your contribution will support our mission to inspire all people to live in unison with our planet through inclusive education focused on diverse ecosystems.

plants + OCEAN + people

Stay informed & connected
Planning a Trip to the Garden?

Some people visit us to relax; some seek adventure; some come to learn and experience local culture.

We are fortunate to provide a place where you can have all of these experiences and more.

 

Know Your Plants of the Week

 Alexandra PalmArchontophoenix alexandrae The Alexandra palm is a towering feature at HTBG. Growing up to 40 feet with leaves about 6 to 7 feet long, these palm forests can’t be missed. The palm is native to Queensland and New South Wales, Australia, and naturalized here in Hawaii and parts of Florida. It prefers littoral rain forest and locations that receive heavy rain events. The ability......

Alpinia malacenssis Commonly referred to as “Giant White Shell” Alpinia is a genus of flowering plants in the ginger family, Zingiberaceae, named for Prospero Alpini, a 17th-century Italian botanist who specialized in exotic plants. This rare species has stunning snow white flowers with large, soft velvety leaves and that famous gingerly scent. Scientific studies have shown that extracts from......

Amherstia nobilis This tropical tree is a critically endangered species of northeast India. It is the only member of the genus Amherstia and is widely cultivated as an ornamental in the humid tropics. It is native to Burma, hence the common name “The Pride of......

Anthurium cupulispathum  A species of anthurium with giant foliage, each leaf growing to be up to 5’ in size! The flower is also larger than other anthurium species The large leaves make for a great photo opportunity reminiscent of the famous photo of Brazilian landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx. The leaves are found......

Barringtonia asiatica Fish Poison Tree, contains a chemical compound called saponin that is toxic to fish and other cold blooded animals. When Onomea was a fishing village, Hawaiians would make a pulp of this plant to extract the phytochemical and stun fish in freshwater streams......

Breadfruit Breadfruit has long been a staple food source in the pacific. Originating in South Asia, it’s believed to have spread through Oceania by early Polynesians, hence many people use the term Canoe Plant when referring to Breadfruit . Breadfruit, or Artocarpus altilis, is a......