Plant of the Week

 Alexandra PalmArchontophoenix alexandraeThe Alexandra palm is a towering feature at HTBG. Growing up to 40 feet with leaves about 6 to 7 feet long, these palm forests can't be missed. The palm is native to Queensland and New South Wales, Australia, and naturalized here in Hawaii and parts of Florida. It prefers littoral rain forest and locations that receive heavy rain events. The ability to...

Breadfruit Breadfruit has long been a staple food source in the pacific. Originating in South Asia, it's believed to have spread through Oceania by early Polynesians, hence many people use the term Canoe Plant when referring to Breadfruit . Breadfruit, or Artocarpus altilis, is a member of...

Heliconia A genus of flowering plants in the monotypic family Heliconiaceae. There are 194 known species most of which are native to the tropical Americas, but a few are indigenous to certain islands of the western Pacific and Maluku. Many species of Heliconia are found in...

Elaeocarpus angustifolius This rainforest tree is native to Eastern Australia. While not featured in the main garden this tree grows on one of our neighboring properties not open to the public. The fruits are unmistakable due to their incredible color, it's no wonder the common name...

Deckenia nobilis The desired edible hearts from this species of palm is the reason why it is considered vulnerable and in decline. Today remote stands growing on rocky crags, and outcrops are difficult for humans to reach, which offers natural protection. Tree nurseries on the Island of Praslin, Seychelles part of cluster north of Madagascar, raise D. nobilis seedlings and distribute them locally for planting.  The dark green, pinnate fronds are dressed in black spines on the underside; they...

Tabebuia pallida Truly a stunningly beautiful tree when in bloom. The Pink Tabebuia is a small stature tree also known as the “Carib Queen” which depicts its origin from the Caribbean. During most of the year the trees bear very characteristic broad leaflets that are pointed...